Site Content

Thursday

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehab - PrePlanning and Incident Action Planning for EIR

This is final segment of our four part series on the topic of Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation (EIR). In this segment we'll discuss the importance of planning and pre planning for EIR. We also discuss the role of the incident safety officer and Incident Action Planning that includes EIR. Joining me for this series is Dr. Jeremy Cushman, Medical Director for Monroe County, NY.

In this series we've reviewed the need for rehab, special logistical considerations in cold weather EIR operations, and the importance of "pre-habilitation" and remaining fit for activity during cold weather.  Changing weather conditions and the use of Incident Action Planning in relation to rehabilitation operations are covered in this final segment. 

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation was produced for emergency responders off all disciplines. Health care professionals who may treat responders in the hospital environment  will also benefit from this background information. For more on cold weather emergencies, click here.



Click the player below for the audio from all four parts in this series.

Tuesday

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehab - "Pre-Habilitation"

This is part three of a four part series on the topic of Emergency Incident Rehabilitation. In this segment we'll discuss the importance of "pre-hab" and physical fitness. Joining me for this series is Dr. Jeremy Cushman, Medical Director for Monroe County, NY.

In part one we reviewed the need for rehab, in part two we discussed special logistical considerations.  Changing weather conditions and the use of Incident Action Planning in relation to rehabilitation operations are covered in part four. 

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation was produced for emergency responders off all disciplines. Health care professionals who may treat responders in the hospital environment  will also benefit from this background information. For more on cold weather emergencies, click here.


;


Click the player below for complete audio version.

Thursday

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehab - Logistical Considerations

This is part two of a four part series on the topic of Emergency Incident Rehabilitation. In this segment we address the special logistical considerations for establishing Emergency Incident Rehabilitation in cold weather. Joining me for this series is Dr. Jeremy Cushman, Medical Director for Monroe County, NY.

In part one we discussed the need for rehabilitation. In part three we'll cover the importance of "Pre-Hab" and physical fitness. Changing weather conditions and the use of Incident Action Planning in relation to rehabilitation operations are covered in part four.

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation was produced for emergency responders off all disciplines. Health care professionals who may treat responders in the hospital environment  will also benefit from this background information. For more on cold weather emergencies, click here.




Click the player below for complete audio version.


Tuesday

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation - The Need for Rehab

This is part one of a four part series on the topic of Emergency Incident Rehabilitation. In this segment we'll discuss the need for rehab at all situations - truly a "sector for all seasons". Joining me for this series is Dr. Jeremy Cushman, Medical Director for Monroe County, NY.

In part two we'll discuss special logistical considerations, part three covers the importance of "Pre-Hab" and physical fitness. Changing weather conditions and the use of Incident Action Planning in relation to rehabilitation operations are covered in part four. 

Cold Weather Emergency Incident Rehabilitation was produced for emergency responders off all disciplines. Health care professionals who may treat responders in the hospital environment  will also benefit from this background information. For more on cold weather emergencies, click here.


l

Click the player below for complete audio version.

Traditional lectures find new life in "new media"

Co-posted on the GVNA blog

Using multi-media and internet strategies to reach today's health care and EM students.

I stumbled on this topic while reading one of my favorite blogs, Life in the Fast Lane. The post, Peer Reviewed Lectures, really caught  my attention. As a semi-pro blogger and podcast host, I truly appreciate (and honestly believe in) the incredible value of multiple instructional strategies and web-based interaction. Traditional topics will find new life when a "new media" twist is applied. All you have to do is embrace the New Media delivery!

This video from Academic Emergency Medicine outlines criteria for peer reviewed lectures.


Peer Reviewed Lectures from Academic Emergency Medicine on Vimeo.

Continuing education becomes cutting edge and lecture content can be taken at-will or on demand to satisfy specific needs. This New Media approach also reaches out (and grabs on to) the Millennial Generation as well as those who want that convenience offered by this media. In the video below, Danielle Hart, MD (Hennepin County Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine) outlines the learning style differences between various generations and how this non-traditional instructional tool bridges the educational gap. 

Friday

What will the next AED be?

The following anonymous comment on Paramedic Future (Mitigation Journal July, 2009)

Anonymous wrote:
Thank you for your post. Examining your argument that technology will eventually replace the need for the paramedic I find some flaws. I feel like your argument is similar to saying why teach long division now that we have calculators. However, the computer diagnosis on the 12-lead is horribly unreliable. I don't know how many 911 calls I've made for "ST wave abnormality" on perfectly good 12-leads. As providers and educators we need to push for solid physical assessment skills and diagnostic skills. The ability to read and interpret a 12-lead is still a paramount paramedic skill. I currently work one of my jobs at a teaching hospital and while moving a trauma patient a physician shouted, "the patient is in v-tach!" the physician reached for the defibrillator without question as one of the medics explained that the alarm on the monitor was merely artifact from movement. If we've learned anything it is that common sense isn't common at all. We need to continue to educate and trust the interpretation of skilled providers over technology.
My response:

I don't believe that technology will replace paramedics. In fact:
"...technology can't consider the patient as a whole and put all the assessment pieces together like a skilled paramedic can." 
In the original piece I bring up the possibility that reliance on technology may not be a good thing:
"...Like any other technology, once we become accustomed to it, we become dependent on it...In the case of EKG's I'm afraid we'll eventually decide we don't need to teach reading them any longer...what will we do when technology fails?"
The point is that technology may put appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment possibilities in the hands of more responders and may make it possible to speed treatment in the field, improved triage of limited (and costly) hospital specialty care services, and pave the way for advanced practice paramedics.

In the 1950's, CPR was a physician-only skill. Defibrillation was a paramedic skill until the 1980's. Today, both CPR and automated external defibrillators make it possible for almost any member of the public to improve survival from cardiac arrest. We have to think forward to what the next "AED" will be.

Thursday

Unwanted contacts on your phone

E. Coli on the list of nasty bugs in your contact list!

Think about this the next time you put your phone to your face -
A study published in October, 2011, found that 92% of cellular phones are contaminated with nasty bacteria...including E. Coli. The cause of the contamination is people using their phones while in the restroom. Texting while toileting has been identified as a contributing factor. 

According to research conducted by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Queen Mary, University of London:
  • 92% of phones had bacteria on them.
  • 82% of hands had bacteria on them.
  • 16% of hands and 16% of phones had E. coli bacteria.
How do you decontaminate your phone/handheld device after use in the clinical environment?

Read the full article from Medscape here.